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Late Pregnancy Position Check - $50

A New Conception performs late position checks after 37 weeks. Why not take this opportunity not only to check your baby’s position but to take a peek in at your baby?
A New Conception will watch and listen to your baby’s heartbeat during a position check too. Isn’t that the best sound in the world?

Facing Downward - Best Birthing Position

Baby Birthing Position Face Down

This baby is in the occiput anterior position, the most preferable—and common—fetal position. With the face down and turned slightly to the side, the smallest part of the baby’s head leads the way through the birth canal.

Facing Upward

Baby Birthing Position Face Upward

This baby is in the occiput posterior position, with the face up toward the mother’s abdomen. In this fetal position, a baby can’t extend his or her head out from under the pubic bone, which can make delivery more difficult.

Most babies eventually turn on their own, if there’s enough room. Your healthcare provider might try to rotate the baby’s position by frequently changing your position or by manually reaching through your vagina and using his or her hand as a wedge. Sometimes, forceps are used to rotate or deliver the baby. You might need an incision to extend the opening of the vagina (episiotomy) to ease delivery.

Buttocks First

Baby Birthing Position Buttocks First

This baby is in the frank breech presentation—head located near the top of the uterus and buttocks facing the birth canal with both legs pointing straight up in front of the body. The frank breech presentation is the most common type of breech presentation.

Your health care provider might try to rotate the baby manually by placing his or her hands on your abdomen, then pushing or lifting (external version). This is usually done in the hospital while the baby is closely monitored. A C-section might be recommended if a baby remains in a breech position.

Feet First

Baby Birthing Position Feet First

This baby is in a complete breech presentation—head located near the top of the uterus, legs folded at the knees and crossed, and feet near the buttocks.

Your health care provider might try to rotate the baby manually by placing his or her hands on your abdomen, then pushing or lifting (external version). A C-section might be recommended if a baby remains in a breech position.