Late pregnancy position check

Late Position Checks – $50

We perform late position checks only AFTER 37 weeks unless your health care provider would like to get an idea earlier.

Late in pregnancy, sometimes your health care provider may question just what position your baby is sitting.  A quick ultrasound is the best way to be certain what position your baby is in.

A New Conception performs position checks.  Why not take this opportunity to not only check your baby’s position but to take a peek at baby?  A New Conception will watch and listen to your baby’s heartbeat during a position check too.  Isn’t that the best sound in the world?

Fetal positions before birth

If your baby is in a head-down position, with the back of his head slightly towards the front of your tummy (anterior position), your labor is likely to be shorter and easier. Most babies get into this position by the end of pregnancy . In an anterior position, your baby fits snugly into the curve of your pelvis




Facing downward ~ best birthing position

 occiput anterior position
Occiput anterior position

This baby is in the occiput anterior position, the most preferable — and common — fetal position. With the face down and turned slightly to the side, the smallest part of the baby’s head leads the way through the birth canal

 

 

 


Facing upward

occiput posterior position
Occiput posterior position

This baby is in the occiput posterior position, with the face up toward the mother’s abdomen. In this fetal position, a baby can’t extend his or her head out from under the pubic bone — which can make delivery more difficult.

Most babies eventually turn on their own, if there’s enough room. Your health care provider might try to rotate the baby’s position by frequently changing your position or by manually reaching through your vagina and using his or her hand as a wedge. Sometimes, forceps are used to rotate or deliver the baby. You might need an incision to extend the opening of the vagina (episiotomy) to ease delivery.


Buttocks first

frank breech presentation
Frank breech presentation

This baby is in the frank breech presentation — head located near the top of the uterus and buttocks facing the birth canal with both legs pointing straight up in front of the body. The frank breech presentation is the most common type of breech presentation.

Your health care provider might try to rotate the baby manually by placing his or her hands on your abdomen, then pushing or lifting (external version). This is usually done in the hospital while the baby is closely monitored. A C-section might be recommended if a baby remains in a breech position, however.


Feet first

complete breech presentation
Complete breech presentation

This baby is in a complete breech presentation — head located near the top of the uterus, legs folded at the knees and crossed, and feet near the buttocks.

Your health care provider might try to rotate the baby manually by placing his or her hands on your abdomen, then pushing or lifting (external version). A C-section might be recommended if a baby remains in a breech position, however.

 

 


Lying sideways

transverse lie
Transverse lie

This baby is in a transverse lie — positioned horizontally across the uterus, rather than vertically. In a transverse lie, the baby’s back might be positioned down, with one shoulder pointing toward the birth canal, or up, with the hands and feet facing the birth canal. Although many babies lie sideways early in pregnancy, few babies begin labor in this position.

Your health care provider might try to rotate the baby manually by placing his or her hands on your abdomen, then pushing or lifting (external version). If labor has already begun, a C-section is recommended.


Twins

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Twins can usually be delivered vaginally if both babies are in the headfirst position. If only the lower twin is in the headfirst position, as shown here, the lower twin can often be delivered vaginally — and the second twin can sometimes be turned or delivered feet or buttocks first. If this can’t be done, the second twin might be delivered by C-section. If the lower twin isn’t positioned headfirst or neither twin is headfirst, both twins are usually delivered by C-section

 


Late in pregnancy, sometimes your health care provider may question just what position your baby is sitting.  A quick ultrasound is the best way to be certain what position your baby is in.

A New Conception performs position checks.  Why not take this opportunity to not only check your baby’s position but to take a peek at baby?  A New Conception will watch and listen to your baby’s heartbeat during a position check too.  Isn’t that the best sound in the world?

Don’t want to know the sex of your baby? No worries!  During any ultrasound your baby’s sex can be kept a secret.  We simply have you close your eyes when we first place the probe on your belly.  Most babies are head down and we know where to place our ultrasound probe.  If your baby is tushie down or in any breech position, we will know very quickly.  From there, we position the ultrasound probe where your baby’s head is.